Jumpstart Your Job Hunt With a Quality Resume – Ultimate Resume Writing Dos and Don’ts

After years of working in the executive staffing and recruiting industry, collaborating with countless hiring managers and human resource administrators across various industries, I acquired a thorough understanding of what these individuals were looking for in potential job candidates. I began to see patterns, consistencies, universal tendencies, and I began to see just how important a good resume really is.

As a point of fact, hiring managers only spend around 15 seconds perusing over a new resume and they are really only looking for a couple of things when they do. They’re on autopilot, for the most part. They want to know:

1) Who have you worked for?

2) Have you had steady employment?

3) What notable achievements and recognitions have you had throughout your career?

4) What do you have to offer which will meet with their specific needs?

An effective resume will answer those questions with a minimal amount of effort and, as with any effective marketing tool, it will also leave the reader wanting to know more. You want to give them just enough info to prompt them into action. That’s when they pick up the phone and call you for an interview!

So your resume is your professional introduction. It’s your only chance to make a memorable first impression and I can tell you right now that if you do not take your resume seriously, then your resume will never be TAKEN seriously. It really is that simple.

Now, if you feel you are capable and qualified to write a compelling and dynamic resume, then by all means give it a shot. However, if you’re not extremely confident in your skills as a writer and/or marketer, I would sincerely recommend you hook up with a professional resume writer to help you craft the perfect resume for you. A seasoned veteran in these matters can be an invaluable resource. After all, I trust my mechanic to work on my car because he works on cars all day, every day. Well there are people out there who work on resumes all day, every day…so trust us!

For those who are convinced they have what it takes, this article should help you with some of the finer points. Although job markets and technologies are always changing, there are some things which are fairly universal and constitute the basic principles of a winning resume. To guide you along, I have compiled a comprehensive list of resume writing Do’s and Don’ts, complete with secret tricks of the trade as well as a collection of common mistakes people make. So pay close attention, take my advice into consideration, and you’ll be on your way to landing that dream job in no time!

DON’T

Misrepresent the Truth – Lying on your resume is never a good idea. You don’t want to start a professional relationship based on the misrepresentation of facts. Just as you would hope the employer is not lying to you about the job requirements, salary, etc, they expect you are not lying to them about your background and/or skill sets. It’s the decent and respectable way to conduct yourself and there is no room for dishonesty in the workplace because, sooner or later, these things always have a tendency to come to the surface. Remember: The truth shall set you free!

Use Slang or Jargon – You need to be as professional as possible in the context of your resume if you expect to be taken seriously as a professional. For this reason, you should avoid using familiar lingo, slang, or jargon in your resume. The exception to this rule is when using very industry-specific terminology to describe your particular skills. This can actually help to lend you credit as a knowledgeable individual and an expert in your field, but your such terms wisely and tactfully.

Include a Picture – Unless you’re a model or in a professional dependent on physical attributes, I always advise against putting your picture on your resume. In my experience, it can do more harm than good. So keep the formatting of the resume simple and let the hiring manager use their imagination until they call you in for an interview. Plus, your looks should have nothing to do with your professionalism or the credentials qualifying you for the position. In the business world (even legally), your appearance should have no value as a selling point for you as a competent job candidate.

Include Irrelevant Info (AKA “Fluff”) – If it’s not important, don’t add it to your resume. If you were a cook 10 years ago but now you’re looking for a job in retail management, don’t clutter up your resume with irrelevancy. Try to put yourself in the shoes of the hiring manager and ask yourself what they would see as important. How does your background correspond with their needs as an employer? Anything else is fluff. Don’t add your hobbies to your resume. Don’t add your references (if they want them, they’ll ask at the appropriate time). And don’t include your high school education either. Finally, don’t be redundant and repeat yourself throughout the context of your resume. It’s OK to reinforce themes, but don’t push it. If your title has been Branch Manager at each of your past three companies, find a way to differentiate each of these positions and highlight your most notable accomplishments. Don’t just copy and paste the line “Managed a team of branch employees” three times. That will get you nowhere.

Include a Core Competencies Section – I find Core Competency sections to be fairly worthless in a professional resume and I’ll tell you why: It doesn’t matter if you’re a waitress, an administrative assistant, a nurse, a teacher, or a sales executive – it doesn’t matter what kind of background you have – anyone can describe themselves as “Self-Motivated”. Anyone can say they are “Goal Oriented” and “Results-Driven” and everyone has “Strong Verbal and Written Skills” when they’re applying for a job. I can say with some degree of certainty that the majority of hiring managers and HR administrators skip right past a Core Competencies section and with good reason. The key to a successful resume is in SHOWING a manager how you are “Results-Driven” and “Goal Oriented” instead of just TELLING them! Your accomplishments speak volumes, let them do the talking. If you are going to include a Core Competencies section, make sure it’s unique and adds value. Again, vagueness will often work against you here because it cheapens the experience of reading your resume.

Rely on Templates or Sample Resumes – If you are surfing the web and looking for a good resume sample or template to use as a guideline for your own resume, make sure the sample you settle on is appropriate considering your background, the industry you’re in, and your career intentions. Because when it comes right down to it, different styles of resumes should be employed in different industries. By way of illustration, a computer programmer’s resume will vary greatly from that of a sushi chef. They both have very different skill sets which need to be highlighted in very different ways in order to be effective. If both those individuals tried to write their resumes in the same format, it would be a disaster. Hiring authorities, respectively, each have their own expectations and some resume formats are better than others at addressing those individual expectations.

Write a Novel and Call it a Resume – I repeat: Do NOT write a novel and call it a resume. Too many people make this mistake. They want to write this wordy, drawn-out thesis outlining their life story and their career aspirations. They have all these skills and accomplishments and they want to include them all in there somewhere, but the problem is most people just don’t know when to stop. Don’t be afraid to leave out some of the details and explore those further in the interview process. My advice is to highlight only those aspects of your background which are most applicable for the job, or types of jobs, you are planning to apply for.

Limit Yourself to One Page – In contrast to the last point, you may not want to limit yourself to a 1-page resume. A common misconception is that a professional resume HAS to be one page. However, that’s not really the case these days. I while back, before the miracles of technology, I may have agreed. But now that most resumes are being read on a computer screen versus on paper, there’s no need to limit yourself in such a way. Those who try to cram all their info on 1-page resume usually resort to smaller font and zero spacing. When viewed on screen, this is not an attractive format and it’s hard to read. Now, I’m not saying you should write a 20-page catalogue of your experiences, nor am I advocating the use of size 20 font. Instead, I would say 12-14 size font should suffice and I recommend you keep it at two pages. That leaves plenty of room to say what needs to be said. Of course, if you have limited experience then a 1-page resume will do just fine.

DO

Use Bullet Points – When it comes time to explain your experiences in your resume, use bullet points to outline your accomplishments. It is much easier to read and even easier to skim, which is what hiring managers are doing most of the time anyways. Bullet points draw attention to important information. They are also visually appealing and make the information seem more accessible to the reader. So keep them short and meaningful. Some people opt for a short paragraph explaining their duties and responsibilities, followed by bullet points highlighting their most notable achievements. This too is acceptable, just make sure to keep that paragraph very succinct and avoid any redundancies as well.

Have a Strong Objective Statement – Although this is a matter of some debate these days, I firmly believe a strong, concise Objective Statement can go a long way. First off, it immediately tells the reader what job you are applying for. That can be a big deal when you’re submitting your resume to a HR representative who has their hands full with many different job openings. Recruiters as well. And if you’re a senior manager, you don’t want to get thrown in the pile with the mail clerks, right? Not only that, but an effective Objective Statement will briefly summarize your qualifications so a hiring manager can make an instantaneous decision whether or not to keep reading. They do that anyways, so why not address their needs in the intro and add value by showing them what you have to offer right off the bat. Remember, I’m only talking about one sentence here. One sentence to market yourself. Once sentence to spark their interest. You don’t want to give the reader too much to think about, rather you want them to proceed on and read the rest of your resume. So grab their attention, establish your professional identity, show them your value, and let them move on to the good stuff!

Choose the Right Format – One thing you need to remember is that there is not one universal formatting methodology because, in truth, there is no cookie-cutter way of writing a resume. What works best for one person may not be best for another. Some people will benefit from a Chronological resume whereas that format may be detrimental to someone who has jumped around a lot in their career. The only thing I can suggest is that you do your homework. Know the different types of resumes (Chronological, Functional, Targeted, and Combination) and know the distinct merits of each. Then make an informed decision as to which style is best for you. If you are surfing the web and looking for a good resume sample or template to use as a guideline for your own resume, make sure the sample you settle on is appropriate considering your background, the industry you’re in, and your career intentions.

Cut to the Chase – Don’t waste time…get to the good stuff. As I said before, a hiring manager will most often skim, scan, and glance over a resume. Keep in mind that they have specific questions in mind when they review a resume for the first time and they expect specific answers. One of the most important questions they are asking is: “Who has this person worked for in the past?” For this reason, I always suggest that serious job seekers highlight their experiences first and foremost. Right below your one-sentence Objective Statement you should transition into and Experience section. In this section you should list your past employers, the years you worked for them, your job titles, and a brief description of your duties there. Of course, this may not be the best approach for some people. If your background is heavily dependent on your academic experience, then you may want to jump into that first.

Focus on Your Target – My reasons for saying this are as follows: An unfocused resume sends a very clear message that you are unfocused about your career. And a hiring authority doesn’t want to see that. They want to see that you have career goals and that those aspirations correspond with their needs as an employer. So keep in mind that a customized resume, modified for a specific position, is always preferable to a generalized and vague resume. If you’re serious enough about a job then you should take the extra time and effort to tailor a resume to that job’s requirements. I assure you your efforts will not go unnoticed.

Be Articulate and Grammatically Exact – In my humble opinion, it’s of the utmost importance to be eloquent within the context of your resume and to make sure you’re using proper grammar and syntax. For your current job description, use the present tense. For past jobs, use past tense. This seems like a no-brainer, but again you’d be surprised at how many people make this mistake. Being articulate can go a long way as well. Most hiring managers will consider it a plus if you can convey your level of intelligence in your written communications. So don’t be afraid to break out the thesaurus and make sure you have someone else edit your resume before you send it out to potential employers. That’s imperative!

K.I.S.S. – A wiser man than me once made this bold statement and it’s extremely applicable when writing your resume: Keep It Simple, Stupid! Too many people make too much of an effort to “stand out from the pack” and in doing so they may unwittingly be hurting themselves. In some professions, such as the creative design field, it may be advantageous to show your originality and imagination, but in other business fields this kind of flamboyancy in a resume is unnecessary and can actually be injurious to your cause. In terms of formatting, the same holds true. I have found that people tend to have much more success when they opt for an uncomplicated formatting style. Some people still want to get all jazzed up with pictures and text boxes and funky font, but that’s just fluff. It’s noise. It is irrelevant to the purpose of your resume, which is to sell yourself through highlighting your skills and accomplishments. And hiring managers see right through that!

Take Your Resume Seriously – As previously stated, if you don’t take your resume seriously then your resume will not be TAKEN seriously. If you choose not to work with a professional, then at the very least have an impartial third-party edit it for you and give you some constructive feedback. This is for your own sake. What happens when you accidentally type “Manger” instead of “Manager”? Do you think Spell Check is going to bail you out? Whatever you do, don’t send it out to potential employers without having someone else look it over. Some people just need to swallow their pride because when it comes right down to it, you may be the best at what you do, but if you don’t write resumes for a living then chances are there’s someone out there more qualified to write your resume than you are. Please consider that if you’re serious about being taken seriously!

So there it is…everything you need to know about writing your resume. I sincerely wish you the best of luck in your endeavors and feel free to contact me if you ever need any assistance. I’m here to help!

10 Tips for Writing the Perfect Resume

A resumé is the most powerful document in your job search arsenal. A good resume can unlock doors to an array of professional opportunities. While writing the ideal resume can be a significant challenge for many of us, you can simplify the process by incorporating the following steps:

1. Decide whether your resumé should be chronological or functional. A chronological resume emphasizes your work history, with your most recent position listed first while a functional resume focuses on your skills and experience. Opt for a chronological resume if you have a consistent work history. Conversely, if there are significant gaps in your employment, a functional resume may be a better choice.

2. Focus on accomplishments, not job responsibilities. This is perhaps the biggest mistake I see on resumes. Your resumé should not consist of a list of your duties and responsibilities. It should tell potential employers what you have accomplished. For example, don’t just say you were responsible for managing a $10 million budget, discuss how you were able to cut expenses by 10 percent and save a million dollars. This makes a far more powerful statement about what you can bring to an organization.

3. Use specific examples to demonstrate your accomplishments. For instance, if you are a salesperson, describe the time you persuaded a reluctant customer to buy your product. If you are a training specialist, discuss the online training courses you developed that significantly reduced educational expenses. If you are a marketing manager, describe the promotional strategy you developed that increased company sales.

4. Create a keyword-rich resume. You can do this by reading job descriptions and company information, and then making a list of the keywords used by the employer. For example, if an organization is seeking candidates who are “results-oriented” and “dependable”, you should include these terms on your resumé. Likewise, if a position seeks a person with “HTML programming” experience, you should include this phrase.

5. Pay attention to resume length. Generally speaking, new entrants to the workforce should have a one-page resume, seasoned professionals can have a two-page resume and senior executives can use a resume that is three or four pages long. Academic resumes, also known as a curriculum vita, can be longer. However, never make your resumé any longer than necessary.

6. Use a career summary, not a career objective. A career summary tells employers what you have to offer while a career objective tells them what you want. It is better to communicate the value you bring to an organization. Besides, your cover letter will communicate your career objective. Remember, your career summary should be a brief statement about the skills and credentials that qualify you for a particular position.

7. Tailor your resumé for a particular job opening. Do not create a single, all-purpose resumé to submit for every job opening. Rather, think of your resumé as a template that you will modify based on the requirements of a particular opening. Don’t worry, you just have to make minor tweaks for different openings in the same field.

8. Develop multiple resumes. If you will be applying for jobs in different occupational areas (e.g., marketing and human resources), you need to create more than one resume. This also applies if you will be seeking opportunities in the same occupation, but in different industries (e.g., manufacturing and education). The resumes will not be vastly different, but they will need to reflect the differences in job expectations and keyword usage.

9. Include well-written and accurate content. Your resume is a reflection of your professionalism. Poor grammar and misspelled words will diminish your perceived expertise and credibility. Even worse is using inaccurate or untrue information. Most of the time, fallacious resume information will not help you get a job and it may come back to haunt you.

10. Proofread, proofread and proofread again. Yes, read your completed resume at least three times. Then have a friend or colleague proofread it for you. They will find errors you missed even if you have reviewed it multiple times.

Resume Writing – 12 Tips

A resume is like a short story that grabs the reader and keeps him or her engaged. This article presents 12 sure-fire tips that have benefited hundreds (college students, clients, colleagues, family, and friends) regardless of the career field or level. They’re certain to help you too.

12 Tips

· (Tip – 1) Prepare a brief profile

Start strong with a brief profile not an objective. Listing an objective is a thing of the past. What should your profile contain? Two or three short snappy phrases that summarize your experience, skills, and personality traits. Regarding the latter, avoid writing a laundry list.

So, what three words best describe you? Your dominant personality traits surface in your professional and personal life. In other words, wherever you go you’re there.

· (Tip – 2) Don’t sound like your job description.

Do not turn your resume into a document that reads like a boring job description. Instead, discuss accomplishments. How did you make a difference? What skills or unique abilities were utilized to make things better. Pick one or two accomplishments from your current position. Provide a brief summary.

· (Tip – 3) Select the right format.

All in all, two types of resume formats exist- chronological and functional. While the former begins with your most current position and works backward, the latter builds the resume around your dominant skills.

· (Tip – 4) Include special training/professional development.

For more than a few years, I advised a friend to include a professional development section on her resume. Why? Employers like to see what you’ve been doing since graduating from college. As a result of working in the corporate arena, she racked up a lot of training. Well, to make a long story short, it made her standout and receive even better offers.

· (Tip – 5) List education and credentials last.

You are not selling your education; degrees are a dime a dozen. You are promoting your unique skills that help potential employers solve problems. Hence, list your credentials last, not first.

· (Tip – 6) Determine the appropriate length.

A recent college graduate, high school student, or person entering the workforce for the first time will not have as nearly much to say as someone more experienced.

· (Tip – 7) Omit references.

Create a special file for references. By the way, your references should be people who know you in a professional capacity. And, make sure each person has good written and verbal communication skills.

· (Tip – 8) Create a tagline.

Imagine this. You work in human resources as a recruiter. Every day you receive tons of resumes when you open your email; no one stands out because the subject lines say things like Resume or the resume of. Be creative! Use a tagline. When you save the document, use the tagline not your name.

· (Tip – 9) Always send a cover letter.

The letter should state what you’re applying for, how you can contribute, and most important, it should refer the reader to the resume. Cut and paste or copy the letter into the body of your email.

· (Tip – 10) Use present tense.

Instead of writing in the past tense, use the present. It adds punch and lets a potential employer know that you still make a positive impact.

· (Tip – 11) Be creative.

Why not include a testimonial? Select a comment or two from a performance review.

· (Tip – 12) Develop a resume website.

If you really want to standout, develop a professional resume website. It’s free and a template is provided. Checkout Wix.

Resume Writing Services What Do They Do And Why Should You Use Them

Before I go in to the details of what exactly is a resume writing service, perhaps it would be a good idea to look at the distinction between a CV and a Curriculum Vitae and a resume. The word curriculum vitae is a noun, a brief account of a person’s education, qualifications, and experience, typically sent with a job application. CV is the shortened form of curriculum vitae and resume is a synonym (another word for) curriculum vitae. The bottom line is that CV, curriculum vitae and resume can and should be interchanged depending where in the world you happen to be and what is the most common terminology used locally.

Resume writing services

A resume writing service is a relatively new phenomenon.

In the days before computing, most people wrote their own resume’s and had no need of a resume writing service as no such animal existed. With the advent of the internet, the resume writing services business was born, mainly through people being made redundant in their job in HR and trying to earn a living working from home using the skills that they honed in their previous employment.

Types of resume writing services

There are two distinct types of these

(1) The glorified word processing

These businesses churn out factory type resumes, relying on large volumes of work to keep them in business.

Whilst they do have a place in the market, it should be clear that they cannot provide a professional service as they simply do not have the time to do a thorough job on your resume. they will make sure that the information that you provide is typed up neatly into a standard resume template and the finished resume will look good. The problem is that the job of a resume is to get you interviewed and it is highly unlikely that using these resume writing services will get you the results that you need.

(2) Professional

Professionals will take the time to understand the goals that you set yourself for your career and make 100% certain that the professional resume that they produce is going to do the job it is intended to do.

In fact, many companies will actually guarantee that the resume that is produced will get you interviewed. The main difference therefore in resume writing services is not just the price you pay but the quality of work that is generated and more importantly the results that are gained from the work that is carried out. A professional resume writing service should do their job properly and the resulting interview is testament to that.

Remember that the whole purpose of the CV is to get you interviewed, the interview is where you get the job.

A professional will employ professional people who know what it takes to get that all important interview, the process is not a quick one as writing up a professional resume can take a good time to do.

It would be unusual to be able to turn round that resume in less than 3 days. The best are in demand, their resume writers doing such a good job that repeat business keeps them very busy after not that long in business. The process of actually writing a professional resume take a good writer about six hours from beginning to end so you should expect to pay about a day’s salary depending of course on the quality and demand and track record of the individual resume writer.

Beware of the most expensive resume writing services who often employ self-employed consultants to contract out the work and the quality of resume that you end up receiving very much depends on the quality of the contractor involved.

They can often be quite disillusioned as the parent resume writing services company often takes the vast majority of the money, leaving their consultants poorly paid and rushing to complete a far from professional resume as a result.

Resume Writing For Immigrants

Introduction

We receive resume and cover letter writing requests from job seekers all over world who are interested in employment in Canada, the US and UK. We have received resumes from job seekers in India, China, Philippines, Germany, Poland, and Russia to name a few. From working with these international customers we observe common mistakes made in their CV’s. While we cannot cover the topic of resume writing, this article includes some common observations and practical resume tips for immigrant and foreign workers interested in applying for work in Canada, the US and the UK.

Spelling, Grammar and Writing Style

It is important to ensure your resume and cover letter does not contain spelling mistakes and grammatical errors. These types of errors can significantly reduce your chances of being considered for a job. In fact, many employers will toss your application if they spot these types of mistakes. For foreign applicants, spelling mistakes and grammatical errors are especially damaging since they can lead the employer to conclude that applicant has a poor command of English. It is important to use spell check and grammar tools function in your word processing software before submitting your resume. Another option is to have a professional write it for you or at the very least someone competent to proof your resume. If you prefer to do it yourself, you may enroll in a resume writing course . Many of these courses focus on providing resume templates or resume samples instead of teaching resume writing techniques. While resume templates may be easy to follow the template presented may not be best suited for your particular employment background. For this reason, we advise courses that teach resume writing skills and concepts rather than providing resume templates.

Unlike spelling mistakes and grammatical errors, inappropriate writing style is not so easy to identify. Nonetheless paying attention to writing style can pay huge dividends. Your writing style can signal to the employer that you have paid attention to learning about the local work culture and how professionals communicate within it. For example a cover letter from a foreign applicant that ends with, “I am very excited about this opportunity and would welcome meeting with you to discuss my qualifications in detail. I am available for an interview at your convenience” suggests that the applicant has paid attention to how business professional communicate in North America. On the other hand, a cover letter that ends with, “I would be most respectfully thankful if you would accept my application for your excellent company” would suggest that the applicant has not taken the time to learn the communication styles in the work environment and thus may not fit in so well.

Personal Information Not Related to the Job.

In Canada and the US, Human Rights legislation prohibits hiring discrimination based on grounds such as religion, race, marital status, age, and so on. As such, application forms will not include fields for this type of information and professional interviewers are trained not ask for this type of information in an employment interview. While it may be accepted practice in some countries for job seekers to include such information in their application, it is not accepted practice in some countries such as Canada, US and the UK.

We have received many resumes containing photos and personal information such as religion, marital status, age and so on. While we just advised you not to include a photo or your age, in some situations you may be asked to do so. For example, in some industries like modeling or acting it is common practice as it may be a requirement of the job to cast an individual to play a certain age. The important point here is to know the work culture and environment that you want to become a part of. You want to avoid sending flags to the employer that may suggest that you would not fit in.

Leverage Your Strengths

Foreign applicants frustrated with a lack response need to know that many employers do value foreign experience and knowledge. Companies commonly seek to gain this foreign knowledge by sending their top managers and executives to international offices or by participating in an employment exchange program. While employer may value international experience, it is your responsibility to communicate to the employer how they will benefit from your experience. It is important that you leverage your international experience to your advantage. Perhaps the prospective employer can benefit from your relationships that you have in your native country. Or it can be as simple as your language or knowledge of a specific culture.

In summary, we have observed many common mistakes made in resumes from foreign applicants. Learning how to fit in, while leveraging your differences is the key to success in the employment market. Learning how to fit in doesn’t mean losing your culture. It means learning basic business writing and showing that you can communicate effectively with local professionals. By following the tips above, you will make your resume more “North American” friendly.

Effective Resume Writing

Your resume is an essential part of your job search, it is your opportunity to make a good impression on employers. For this reason, the information on your resume should be pertinent, easy to read, and attractively laid out.

Content

Your resume needs to provide the reader with a general review of your background. Do not clutter your resume with frivolous details. Some critical areas to include are: identifying data, education, work experience, and student/community activities.

Identifying data: Your name, address, and phone number are mandatory. An e0mail address may also be included. Do not include information such as height, weight, and race as they are not qualifications for the job. Information such as willingness to travel or date of availability could be included in an “Additional Information” category at the end of the resume.

Objective: Although there are different views on whether or not to include a career objective, this information enables the reader to quickly learn about your career interests. Objective guidelines: too specific may be limiting, too broad is meaningless. If you include an objective, think about writing 2-3 versions of your resume, each with a different objective. If you choose to have an objective, it should be no more than two lines. You can also leave the objective off and include it in the cover letter.

Sample Objectives:

“Seeking an entry-level position as an accountant in a public accounting firm.”

“To obtain a position as a financial and investment analyst with a major investment bank or large corporation.”

Education: This information should appear in reverse chronological order, with your most recent education first. Include institution, title of degree, major(s), and any honors awarded. Include your GPA only if it is clearly an asset. If you have questions about including your GPA on your resume, please talk with a Career Services staff member. Any publications, professional licenses, or special training may appear in this section., Information about high school generally should not be included. Finally, the degree to which you financed your own education may also be included here (e.g. 80%)

Work Experience: Usually listed in reverse chronological order (present-past), the information includes the organization’s name, location, position held, dates of employment, and a description of your accomplishments. Focus on areas that relate to the position you are seeking and provide evidence of your ability to assume responsibility, follow through and work hard. IF you have had numerous part-time jobs, highlight the most related experiences. Military experience may be included in this section or in its own category.

Student Organization/Community Activities: Here is your opportunity to show your commitment to your major field and to leadership positions outside of the classroom. This may include social organizations such as sororities, student clubs and volunteer work. Additional categories maybe included to emphasize specific accomplishments, such as “Honors” or “Activities.”

References: Do not list references on your resume. Rather, state on your resume that your references are “Available upon request.” Prepare a separate list of professional references (3-5), including name, title, address and business phone number of each person who agreed to be a reference for you. Remember to include your name at the top of the page. Take your Reference List with you when interviewing.

Targeted Resumes

“Targeting your resume means you are customizing your resume for a particular position, company, different objectives, or career field. For example, you may be interested in both financial banking and accounting, but do not want to use the same resume for both areas of business. This is when targeting your resume is useful. You can tailor your resume to each industry, narrowing the focus of your resume. If you download your resume into Microsoft Word, this is where you can make and save different targeted ones.

Design

The appearance of your resume is critical.

Margins: Keep margins even, using appropriate balance of whitespace to printed word.

Style: Sentences need not be complete. Do not write in first person, singular case (do not use “I”). Use 8.5″ x 11″ bond resume paper of a conservative shade.

Length: Try not to exceed three pages, unless you have significant and relevant experience.

Format

There are two commonly used formats:

Chronological: Presents education, experience, extracurricular activities, skills, and achievements in reverse chronological order under each category. Advantages to this style:

Employers are comfortable with this style because it is used often

It is the easiest way to write

Achievements can be displayed as a direct result of work experiences

Functional: Organizes skills and accomplishments into functional groupings that support your job objective, which should be stated. Advantages:

Draws attention to your accomplishments

Allows for greater flexibility in presenting skills gained through low paying jobs or personal experience

Useful when you have a brief or scattered employment record or when changing career fields

Choosing a Format: If skills and accomplishments coincide with your most significant work experiences, go with the chronological format. If you must pull together certain skills and achievements from a variety of experiences to display your strengths, the functional format may work best for you

No two resumes will look alike; format choice is a personal one. There are two basic questions to answer:

Am I communicating the skills I have attained in a way which will fulfill the needs of the employer?

Is the layout I have chosen the best way for those skills to be presented?

Language

Use language which is as persuasive and descriptive as possible. The use of action words will assist in the development of a concise and businesslike resume

Scannable Resumes

Many employers today use computerized scanning systems to review resumes. It is a good idea when sending your resume to a company that you send two versions: your usual resume and one marked “Scannable” at the top. If you are uncertain or hesitant to send two resumes, the human resources or college recruiting department of most companies should be able to inform you if they utilize resume scanning programs. Below are some ideas to keep in mind when designing your “scannable” resume:

Use only plain, white paper, letter sized (8.5″ x 11″)

Keep your resume to one side only

Laser-printed resumes scan best (not a dot matrix printer)

Do not use underlining or italics, as these do not scan well

Try to keep to a 12 pitch font

Send your resume in a large envelope: do not fold it as words in the folds will not scan properly

Limit your use of bullets and avoid use of graphics

Scanning systems often scan for key words or descriptors, so review your resume to make sure you have appropriately used key words that are relevant to your field

The Electronic Resume

An “electronic resume” can mean several things, but generally refers to a resume that is sent to an employer electronically-either via the internet or email. Some companies’ homepages will include a form that you can complete online and submit, which is a type of electronic resume. Some websites, which are geared towards job search assistance, also include these types of resume services. Many students are also putting together personal homepages which includes a link to their resume. More ideas about using technology with your resume can be found in the Electronic Resume Revolution by Joyce Lain Kennedy.

Organize Resume Writing

Step 1 – Write a rough draft and set aside for a day or two

Step 2 – Edit rough draft, seek feedback from Career Services staff

Step 3 – Make changes to final draft

Step 4 – Have two people proofread for spelling

Step 5 – Take a laser printed copy to a printer to have copies made. Obtain extra paper and matching envelopes for cover letters

Resume Writing Made Simple

Before you get a job offer, you need to have a resume. Your resume is your personal marketing tool to be shortlisted and interviewed for a job.

Always remember to tailor your resume to each job application. This demonstrates the relevance between your skills and experience and the needs of the employer. Identify the requirements and selection criteria of the advertised job vacancy. Highlighting how your skills and experience are relevant to the organization's requirements.

Here are some pointers to good resume writing that will help you make a powerful first impression to your prospective employers.

Personal Details

It should include your name, postal address, contact numbers, email address at the top of the page. Consider using a reasonably conservative email address such as your name. I have seen some job applicants with the email address' little rascal "at hotmail address, prospective employers might not find it appropriate and you might missed your chance of being shortlisted.

Career Objective

Career Objective may not be necessary, however, if you are going to include one make sure it specifically matches the job you are applying for.

Professional Experience

The best resumes are short, concise and informative. Structure your work experience in chronological order with your most recent role first. If you have been working for a number of years, simply list the position title, the organizations you have been working for and the dates of your earlier roles. You should also include the following:

Date of employment : Remember to state the months and years for every position. If there are gaps in your employment, for example furthering of your education, explain this briefly in your resume and if you are shortlisted for an interview, you can elaborate it further to the interviewer.

Company and position title : Provide an overview of the nature of the business and include your designation and the duration you are in the position.

Job Summary : Summarise your responsibilities and achievements concisely for every role, showing your contributions to each of the organizations you have worked for.

Ideally, try to quantify your achievements. For example, increased sales by 35% over the period of one year. Structure and list your responsibilities and achievements in bullet point and introduce the point through action verbs, for example "managed", "delivered" to indicate how accomplished you are.

Skills Achievements / Education Qualifications

List your qualifications in chronological order and include the name of the institution, qualification, graduation date and your course of study. List also your skills and achievements in school as well as your past working accomplishments.

References and referees

It is not necessary to include referees on your resume, however, if you would like to include referees, you need to first ask your referee for permission to list them on your resume.

It is also important to ensure that your resume are free of spelling or grammar mistakes. Always highlight your accomplishments and achievements. Remember, the job search process can take time. Do not give up, the time and effort you take in personalizing your resume will pay off when the right role comes along.

Resume Writing With Resume Templates

Resume Templates

Understanding the difference between a resume and curriculum vitae is more important before choosing a template. Curriculum vitae is used to for an academic education whereas a resume is used to apply for a job opening. Job aspirants should look out for a resume template rather than a curriculum vitae template. While selecting resume templates pick the one that matches the work experience and not the work profile. This information is based on a research conducted with top Indian companies. Once the right resume template is chosen, carefully search and delete if there are any watermarks or logos of the website were the resume templates were downloaded. The recruiters would have come across similar resume patterns in their experience, so it is very important to alter the resume template so that it looks different from the usual one. There are many websites offering free resume template without any watermarks or logos in them. It is advisable to use those websites to download the required templates for a better work. With a right resume template in hand the candidate can start editing the information precisely.

Resume Format

Resume Format is nothing but the layout or order of information. There are numerous websites featuring resume formats that are categorized as IT, BPO, Manufacturing and more. Very nearly every resume formats be full of the same set of information. Do not write resume based on a profession, but on experience. It does not matter whether the applicant is using a resume template or not, what matters more is the resume format. If the template is not in a suitable format there is no value of using it.

Resume Writing

Even with a resume template the candidate need to concentrate more on professional resume writing . Walk through the resume writing tips before editing the resume template. Using these guidelines a candidate can prepare a qualified profile even without a master of pattern. The below mentioned resume writing guidelines are provided by experienced HR professionals.

Career Objectives

Writing a career objective is too basic on a professional resume format. Candidates with good work experience need not have to write a career objective. It is more suitable only on a fresher resume. The career objective should explain the candidates focus on the job applied for.

Experience Summary

The experience summary is where the recruiter mainly concentrate on a resume. Always begin the resume with a nice experience summary. Keep in mind that resume writing is not about the past, but for the future, so never go too deep into the previous job details. Just brief the work experience with roles and responsibilities and mention the key achievements accordingly. The awards and promotions gained on the previous company add high value to the profile without doubt.

Education Details

Education details should be mentioned on the resume in an inverted pyramid style. The highest or most recent qualification must be mentioned first. Schooling details can be furnished only if the school is well recognized. Other qualifications like computer courses, languages ​​or other valuable curriculum can also be mentioned if they are relevant to the position applied for. Awards and merits earned during graduation will definitely put on usefulness to the resume.

Personal Details

Personal details should comprise the age, gender and other additional languages ​​the candidate can read write or speak. A descent personal profile includes the candidate name, age and gender which is more suffice for the recruiter to understand the candidates esteem. Never mention father name, religion or blood group on the personal detail which is immaterial and immature.

Extracurricular and Hobbies

Extracurricular activities and other interests can also be mentioned on a professional resume. Never mention watching movies or listening to music as a hobby. It is better to leave the resume without mentioning hobbies as they are not required for a recruiter to select a candidate. A qualified resume format will only feature experience summary, Key achievements, qualification and personal profile.

Other implications

Before writing a resume go through the advertisement posted for the job opening and use the keywords used in the advertisement on the professional resume. Always use Serif fonts for the heading and sans serif font on the content for a fashionable look. The "verdana" font is mostly preferred on the content with a font size of 10. If you maintain a descent LinkedIn profile do not hesitate to mention your profile url in your email note while forwarding your resume to the HR professional. These are the additional information collected from HR professionals. One should not necessarily follow these guidelines, but knowing this information may have a very good impact on professional resume writing.