Tips on Finding a Sponsored Job in Australia

Many people around the world are trying to find the answer to the question: “How do I find a sponsored job in Australia?”.

Finding an Australian employer to sponsor you can be the most difficult part in emigrating to Australia. Most people search for a sponsor by applying to adverts on job search websites or in newspapers. Did you know that only an estimated 30% of all jobs are advertised here? There are theories that around 70% of all jobs in Australia are found in the ‘hidden job market’, meaning they are not advertised through the usual media channels.

This article will give you a plan, using several steps, of how to tap into the hidden job market in Australia, and to help to make your dream of emigrating to Australia become a reality.

1. Do Your Research.

You will not often find Australian employers advertising that they are looking for someone to sponsor from overseas. The main reason being, if there is someone with the required skill set in Australia, it is easier for the Australian employer to offer a job to someone who is already established in Australia and can start work immediately – in comparison with employing a foreign national and going through the sponsorship process, the cost involved and the time delay for the sponsored individual to commence employment in Australia.

You are also unlikely to find an Australian employer to sponsor you through the use of a recruitment agency,unless that recruitment agency specifically mentions in their job advertisement that the Australian employer is willing to sponsor the right candidate.

Search out companies in Australia whom you would like to work for. In general, larger companies in Australia are more likely to sponsor people from overseas than the smaller companies (due to budgets and business scope), however you should not strike out the smaller companies, as some are still willing to sponsor the right person. Wikipedia provides a list of Australian companies. You can also research the Yahoo Companies Directory to find companies in Australia to approach for sponsorship. The advantage of Yahoo is that they have categorised the companies for you to make it easier to find what kind of company you are looking for.

Contact these companies that interest you, sending them your resume / CV and enquire as to whether they have any opportunities available. Many of the larger companies tend to have a “Careers” section on their website, where they enable job seekers to search for their current vacancies, and also to submit their resume and cover letter into their database. This way, if they do not have a current vacancy that is suitable to your experience, they can call upon their database when a position does become available, and contact you.

2. Global Companies

Search out global companies who are based in both your home country and in Australia, and find out whether they offer transfer opportunities – quite often global companies do. Even though it might mean working in your home country for a period of time before an opportunity arises in Australia, it is worth it in the long run, if it means you can emigrate to Australia through that company. Global organisations also tend to look impressive on your CV / resume.

3. Keep a Record

Keep a list of the companies that interest you, and contact them all. I recommend phoning to speak to the manager of the department you would like to work in. If that fails, speak with the Human Resources department. Find out whether they are a company who are willing to sponsor someone from another country with the right skill set. Find out how often they destroy applications /resumes / CVs as well – most companies in Australia hang on to applications for 3-6 months, so to be safe, you should follow up your applications every three months. Keep a record of all of the dates you apply for jobs and speak with the company, for ease of keeping on top of your Australian job applications.

4. Plan a Trip to Australia

Once you have quite a healthy list of companies you would like to work for (no list is too long), and have applied and spoken to all of them, you should plan a trip to Australia where you can meet with each of the employers. If you are unable to set an appointment with every employer, make a plan to visit the company anyway, dropping off your updated resume, and try to get in front of either the department manager, or a Human Resources Manager.

Through making this vital connection with the Australian employers, you reach them on a personal level, and if they like you, they are more inclined to consider sponsorship than if they had not met you at all.

5. Volunteer Work Experience

If you are able to, when you visit Australia, try to line up some volunteering work with some organisations in Australia. Companies that are most likely to accept volunteers are charitable and non-profit organisations. Approach them and set it up before arriving in Australia so you can build it into your plan for your trip to Australia. Also ensure that you are volunteering in the area of your profession. It will be to your advantage if you have experience working in Australia when you are looking for a sponsor, even if it is volunteer employment. “Non Profit Organisations Australia”, has a comprehensive listing of non-profit organisations in Australia by state / region / city or town, and is a great place to search for possible companies to approach for volunteer work.

6. Build your Networks

Use social media, join industry groups, make friends in all the right places and put yourself out there. Use your networks and use other people’s networks – especially if you already know people in Australia. The more you put yourself out there, the more success you will have in finding an Australian employer who is willing to sponsor you. If you think of it this way: most people have at least 100 people in their networks. Therefore if each of those 100 people also have 100 people in their networks, you potentially have access to a network of 1000 people! The more people you are connected to, the more likely you are to find someone who has connections in Australia.

Make everyone that you know, aware of your search for sponsored employment in Australia, and ask them to reach out to anyone that they know, who may be able to help.

You should also try and be wise when building your networks and be selective with you you are connecting with. It would be wise, for example, to strive to make as many connections with Australians as possible, especially if they are working in the profession of your choice. Linked In is fantastic for professional networking and has the benefit of assisting employers to find you. Facebook, and other social networking sites can also be useful, particularly joining industry or Australia-focused groups.

7. Study in Australia

Are there any courses or further education in Australia in your industry you can enroll in? If you can get a student visa and go to Australia to study, you are normally entitled to a certain amount of hours per week that you can work. This is an awesome opportunity for you to network, get your foot in the door and gain valuable Australian experience and qualifications. Quite often, foreign nationals who study in Australia, are able to stay on in Australia afterward, by transferring their visa status and/or through finding sponsored employment in Australia. There is certainly an advantage for applying for jobs when you are already in Australia, as you are immediately available for job interviews. Again – it is making that personal connection with Australian employers.

8. Successful Self-Marketing

Prepare your marketing materials for success. Do your research to ensure that you will be competitive in the Australian job market – that means ensuring your resume / CV is in a successful Australian format, and ensuring you have a high-impact cover letter that will entice the Australian employer to review your resume / CV.

If you are serious about increasing your chances of finding an employer sponsor in Australia, you should consider having your resume professionally rewritten specifically for the Australian job market. Contracting an Australian professional to rewrite your resume to a successful Australian CV template, means that you will be in the hands of a specialist who works on a daily basis with foreign nationals, assisting them to find employment in Australia.

In Summary

Remember: an estimated 70% of jobs in Australia are not advertised, and are found in the Australian ‘hidden job market’. It is essential to your success that you access this enormous resource of job opportunities in Australia.

By following the steps above, and consistently working towards your goal on a long-term basis through thorough research, keeping track of your applications, utilising the hidden job market, building your networks, ensuring your marketing materials are of high quality and competitive in the Australian job market, planning a trip to Australia, considering volunteer work in Australia and/or furthering your studies in Australia; you are guaranteed to increase your likelihood of finding a sponsored job in Australia.

10 Tips for Writing the Perfect Resume

A resumé is the most powerful document in your job search arsenal. A good resume can unlock doors to an array of professional opportunities. While writing the ideal resume can be a significant challenge for many of us, you can simplify the process by incorporating the following steps:

1. Decide whether your resumé should be chronological or functional. A chronological resume emphasizes your work history, with your most recent position listed first while a functional resume focuses on your skills and experience. Opt for a chronological resume if you have a consistent work history. Conversely, if there are significant gaps in your employment, a functional resume may be a better choice.

2. Focus on accomplishments, not job responsibilities. This is perhaps the biggest mistake I see on resumes. Your resumé should not consist of a list of your duties and responsibilities. It should tell potential employers what you have accomplished. For example, don’t just say you were responsible for managing a $10 million budget, discuss how you were able to cut expenses by 10 percent and save a million dollars. This makes a far more powerful statement about what you can bring to an organization.

3. Use specific examples to demonstrate your accomplishments. For instance, if you are a salesperson, describe the time you persuaded a reluctant customer to buy your product. If you are a training specialist, discuss the online training courses you developed that significantly reduced educational expenses. If you are a marketing manager, describe the promotional strategy you developed that increased company sales.

4. Create a keyword-rich resume. You can do this by reading job descriptions and company information, and then making a list of the keywords used by the employer. For example, if an organization is seeking candidates who are “results-oriented” and “dependable”, you should include these terms on your resumé. Likewise, if a position seeks a person with “HTML programming” experience, you should include this phrase.

5. Pay attention to resume length. Generally speaking, new entrants to the workforce should have a one-page resume, seasoned professionals can have a two-page resume and senior executives can use a resume that is three or four pages long. Academic resumes, also known as a curriculum vita, can be longer. However, never make your resumé any longer than necessary.

6. Use a career summary, not a career objective. A career summary tells employers what you have to offer while a career objective tells them what you want. It is better to communicate the value you bring to an organization. Besides, your cover letter will communicate your career objective. Remember, your career summary should be a brief statement about the skills and credentials that qualify you for a particular position.

7. Tailor your resumé for a particular job opening. Do not create a single, all-purpose resumé to submit for every job opening. Rather, think of your resumé as a template that you will modify based on the requirements of a particular opening. Don’t worry, you just have to make minor tweaks for different openings in the same field.

8. Develop multiple resumes. If you will be applying for jobs in different occupational areas (e.g., marketing and human resources), you need to create more than one resume. This also applies if you will be seeking opportunities in the same occupation, but in different industries (e.g., manufacturing and education). The resumes will not be vastly different, but they will need to reflect the differences in job expectations and keyword usage.

9. Include well-written and accurate content. Your resume is a reflection of your professionalism. Poor grammar and misspelled words will diminish your perceived expertise and credibility. Even worse is using inaccurate or untrue information. Most of the time, fallacious resume information will not help you get a job and it may come back to haunt you.

10. Proofread, proofread and proofread again. Yes, read your completed resume at least three times. Then have a friend or colleague proofread it for you. They will find errors you missed even if you have reviewed it multiple times.

Resume Writing – 12 Tips

A resume is like a short story that grabs the reader and keeps him or her engaged. This article presents 12 sure-fire tips that have benefited hundreds (college students, clients, colleagues, family, and friends) regardless of the career field or level. They’re certain to help you too.

12 Tips

· (Tip – 1) Prepare a brief profile

Start strong with a brief profile not an objective. Listing an objective is a thing of the past. What should your profile contain? Two or three short snappy phrases that summarize your experience, skills, and personality traits. Regarding the latter, avoid writing a laundry list.

So, what three words best describe you? Your dominant personality traits surface in your professional and personal life. In other words, wherever you go you’re there.

· (Tip – 2) Don’t sound like your job description.

Do not turn your resume into a document that reads like a boring job description. Instead, discuss accomplishments. How did you make a difference? What skills or unique abilities were utilized to make things better. Pick one or two accomplishments from your current position. Provide a brief summary.

· (Tip – 3) Select the right format.

All in all, two types of resume formats exist- chronological and functional. While the former begins with your most current position and works backward, the latter builds the resume around your dominant skills.

· (Tip – 4) Include special training/professional development.

For more than a few years, I advised a friend to include a professional development section on her resume. Why? Employers like to see what you’ve been doing since graduating from college. As a result of working in the corporate arena, she racked up a lot of training. Well, to make a long story short, it made her standout and receive even better offers.

· (Tip – 5) List education and credentials last.

You are not selling your education; degrees are a dime a dozen. You are promoting your unique skills that help potential employers solve problems. Hence, list your credentials last, not first.

· (Tip – 6) Determine the appropriate length.

A recent college graduate, high school student, or person entering the workforce for the first time will not have as nearly much to say as someone more experienced.

· (Tip – 7) Omit references.

Create a special file for references. By the way, your references should be people who know you in a professional capacity. And, make sure each person has good written and verbal communication skills.

· (Tip – 8) Create a tagline.

Imagine this. You work in human resources as a recruiter. Every day you receive tons of resumes when you open your email; no one stands out because the subject lines say things like Resume or the resume of. Be creative! Use a tagline. When you save the document, use the tagline not your name.

· (Tip – 9) Always send a cover letter.

The letter should state what you’re applying for, how you can contribute, and most important, it should refer the reader to the resume. Cut and paste or copy the letter into the body of your email.

· (Tip – 10) Use present tense.

Instead of writing in the past tense, use the present. It adds punch and lets a potential employer know that you still make a positive impact.

· (Tip – 11) Be creative.

Why not include a testimonial? Select a comment or two from a performance review.

· (Tip – 12) Develop a resume website.

If you really want to standout, develop a professional resume website. It’s free and a template is provided. Checkout Wix.